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India can construct Kishanganga, Ratle projects: Pakistan Stunned

Defence news: Looks like Pakistan has got another lesson in it’s quest to “confront India” for any matter, reasonable or not. The World bank has supported India in it’s projects to build two key hydro power projects. It’s time India starts to take its fair share of waters that it had so generously given to it’s enemy number one.

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Kishanganga power project in Gurez, 160 km (99 miles) Srinagar (Reuters Photo)

Times of India report (read full article here)

WASHINGTON: India is allowed to construct hydroelectric power facilities on tributaries of the Jhelum and Chenab rivers with certain restrictions under the 1960 Indus Waters Treaty (IWT), the World Bank has said.

The World Bank’s comments came as officials from India Pakistan concluded the secretary-level talks over the IWT.

Pakistan opposes the construction of the Kishanganga (330 megawatts) and Ratle (850 megawatts) hydroelectric power plants being built by India in Jammu and Kashmir, the global lender said in a fact sheet issued yesterday.

Noting that the two countries disagree over whether the technical design features of the two hydroelectric plants contravene the treaty, the World Bank said the IWT designates these two rivers as well as the Indus as the “Western Rivers” to which Pakistan has unrestricted use.

“Among other uses, India is permitted to construct hydroelectric power facilities on these rivers subject to constraints specified in annexures to the treaty,” the Bank said in its fact sheet.

It noted that the talks on the technical issues of the IWT took place this week “in a spirit of goodwill and cooperation”.

The parties have agreed to continue discussions and reconvene in September in Washington DC, it said in a separate statement.

In the lengthy fact sheet, the World Bank said Pakistan asked it to facilitate the setting up of a Court of Arbitration to look into its concerns about the designs of the two hydroelectric power projects.

On the other hand, India had asked for the appointment of a neutral expert to look into the issues, contending the concerns Pakistan raised were “technical” ones.

The IWT was signed in 1960+ after nine years of negotiations between India and Pakistan with the help of the World Bank, which is also a signatory.

The World Bank’s role in relation to “differences” and “disputes” is limited to the designation of people to fulfil certain roles when requested by either or both of the parties, the fact sheet said.

Earlier, in a letter dated July 25, the World Bank had assured Indian Ambassador to the US Navtej Sarna its “continued neutrality and impartiality in helping the parties to find and amicable way forward.”

TOI Excerpt ends.

India should not only go ahead full steam on the projects, but explore the waters leaving it’s western borders to the fullest. Sympathizing with the enemy which has always stabbed in the back is not a good idea. A full spectrum response, especially which benefits our own people is the way to go.

Written by Naroop Desai

Naroop Desai loves India and loves to write on defence matters. He has blogged on different subjects at different time. Now he is here with us, sharing his insights on strategy and peace. He is a PG in mass communications.

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